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Volumes 17-20

Arizona Working Papers in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching

University of Arizona

Modern Languages 549

1423 East University Blvd.

P.O. Box 210067

Tucson, AZ  85721-0067

 

Volume 20, 2013

 

Managing Editors 

Senior Editor: Kristen Michelson

Junior Editor:  José A. Álvarez Valencia

Faculty AdvisorDr. David Gramling

 

Area Editors 

Analysis Editor:     Zach Brooks                        

Pedagogy Editor:   Migdalia Rodriguez   

Processes Editor:   Tami Boyens                   

Use Editor:   Katie O'Donnell Christoffersen  

 

Faculty Advisor's Note

       I’m grateful to have been invited and able to serve as Faculty Advisor for The Arizona Working Papers in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching over the past year. Working with this talented and rigorous team of editors, and with the authors whose works we’ve reviewed, has taught me a great deal about the “state of the discourses” in SLAT in 2013. What I have learned is that the pursuit of insight in the field of SLAT is expanding not contracting, as online technologies, new participatory frameworks, and new possibilities for transnational and transinstitutional collaborations arise. In 2013, SLAT is one of the few humanities and social science fields whose raison d’etre is not in crisis or question, even if some of the subfields that constitute it are experiencing severe budget cuts and predicaments of public accountability. Indeed, it seems that the 21st century is shaping up to be the SLAT century—one in which multilingual subjectivities, language mediation initiatives, concepts of multiple civic identity, and linguistic localization technologies touch the lives of rural and urban populaces alike. It is in this spirit of an expanding field of inquiry that the Arizona Working Papers’ editors decided this year to open the Journal to forms of research beyond the empirical models of social science research. While continuing to honor this vigorous tradition, our new call for contributions welcomes also critical and historical essays, pedagogical reflections, case studies in learning technologies, literary-cultural analyses, and “theoretical” pieces, however one might interpret that particular category. Through this expanding aperture—within and upon the kaleidoscopic domain of knowledge we share—The Arizona Working Papers will continue to provide a meeting place for emerging researchers in this still new century. On behalf of the SLAT faculty members of the University of Arizona, I would like to congratulate and heartily thank this issue’s contributors, and the graduate students who labored to bring their work to the page or screen before you.

 

David Gramling

Assistant Professor of German

and Second Language Acquisition and Teaching

Department of German Studies

University of Arizona

 

Table of Contents

 

TEACHING STRATEGIES OF GRAMMATICAL GENDER IN L2 HINDI/URDU

Rajiv Ranjan is a PhD student in SLA at The University of Iowa. His areas of interest cover generative and socio-cultural approaches to SLA. He is also interested in language pedagogy. He has done an M.A. and an M.Phil. in Linguistics. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for the 2010-11 academic year and has been teaching Hindi at University of Iowa since 2010.

 

Yaqiong Cui is a graduate student in the Second Language Studies Program at Michigan State University. Correspondence should be sent to Yaqiong Cui by Email: cuiyaqio@msu.edu

 

ANALYSIS OF L2 LEARNERS’ KNOWLEDGE OF PERFECTIVE LE IN MANDARIN

Yue Shi (石玥) is originally from Beijing, China and has been studying and working in the United States for 5 years. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Arizona. She earned her M.A. from Michigan State University and has taught college-level Chinese language for a little over four years as well as two General Education courses - "Chinese Civilization" and "Languages and Cultures of East Asia". Her research interests primarily focus on acquisition of Chinese as a Second Language, Chinese Linguistics, and Language Pedagogy. 

 

METONYMY IN THE TALE OF GENJI: AN ANALYSIS OF TRANSLATION STRATEGIES

Janel Goodman Murakami is currently a PhD student in the Second Language Acquisition and Teaching program at UA.  Her primary interest is the impact of social interaction on adult second language learning, with particular interest in more closely defining and developing methods of utilizing these processes for learners. Her second language is Japanese. 

 

TAIWAN LANGUAGE-IN-EDUCATION POLICY: SOCIAL, CULTURAL, AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS

Elizabeth Hubbs received both her B.A. in Spanish and M.A. in TESL from the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her research interests include the analysis and sociocultural positions of English as a Foreign Language educational policies in East Asia and indigenous language policies in Taiwan, Brazil, and China.

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Volume 19, 2012 

 

Managing Editor 

Hsin-I Chen, Senior Editor

Kristen Michelson, Junior Editor

 

TABLE OF CONTENT

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNER VARIABLES IN AN URBAN COMMUTER UNIVERSITY SETTING

Gabriela Olivares, University of Northern Iowa

 

THE INTERPRETATION OF PRESENT PROGRESSIVE ASPECTUAL FEATURES BY L2 SPANISH LEARNERS AND HERITAGE LANGUAGE SPEAKERS

Silvia Perez-Cortes, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

 

EXPLORING THE DIFFERENT WAYS SPANISH INSTRUCTORS USE THE PRONOUN WE IN THE CLASSROOM

Anne Reynolds-Case, Louisiana Tech University

 

PROCESSING OF SCRAMBLED SENTENCES BY LEARNERS OF JAPANESE AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Yasumasa Shigenaga, University of Arizona

 

THE MAZE TASK: TRAINING METHODS FOR SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING

Elizabeth Enkin, University of Arizona

 

Biographical Information for the Authors 

 

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Volume 18, 2011

Volume editors:

Soomin Jwa:  Senior Editor 

Hsin-I Chen :  Associate Edito

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Pausing Preceding and Following à/de in Infinitive Phrases in the Production of Native and Non-native Speakers of French

Bilal Genc, Mustafa Mavasoglu & Erdogan Bada

Language Shift and Maintenance among Russian Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union

Natalia Kasatkina

A Conversation-pragmatic Approach to Explore Turkish International Students’ Conceptual Socialization in the United States

Deniz Ortactepe

Vowel Duration in Second Language Spanish Vowels: Study Abroad Versus At-home Learners

John J. Stevens

Cosmopolitanism and Learning English: Perspectives from Hye Lan alias Joanne

Peter De Costa

 

Biographical Information for the Authors

 

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Volume 17, 2010

 

Preface & Table of Contents

Volume Editors: Lingxia Jin, Soomin Jwa

The Production of Rhotic Sounds by Brazilian Speakers of English 

Denise M. Osborne

Contrastive Learner Corpus Analysis of Epistemic Modality and Interlanguage Pragmatic Competence in L2 Writing 

Hsin-I Chen

Students' Perceptions About Teacher Talk in Japanese-as-a-Second Language Classes

Hiroshi Matsumoto

The Effect of Guessing Vocabulary in Reading Authentic Texts AMong Pre-university Students

Hossein Shokouhi & Hamdollah Askari

Study of Compliment Speech Act Realization Patterns Across Gender in Persian

Zohreh Yousefvad

From EFL to ESL: The Influence of Context on Learners' Motivational Profiles

Hanqiong Xu

 

Author, Editor & SLAT Faculty Biographics

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Volumes 11-16, 2004-2009 

Volumes 6-10, 1999-2003

Volumes 1-5, 1995-1998

 

 

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Last updated 19 Aug 2015